All posts in Copyright

Social Media and the Law seminar

Back in April of this year, Andrew Scott-Howman (specialist employment law barrister with Port Nicholson Chambers and co-author of Workface) and I delivered a New Zealand Law Society seminar series on Social Media and the Law.

We discussed three main topics: I discussed “your and your clients’ use of social media for business purposes: a lifecycle approach”, Andrew then discussed “employer and employee use of social media: an employment law perspective”, and I then discussed “third party use of social media against organisations and staff: legal and practical remedies” (also touching on “reform and the future” at the end). Read more…

GOV.UKThose interested in how a single government website may function should take a look at the UK’s beta www.gov.uk site. When you navigate to the site, you’re told immediately that it’s an experimental trial replacement for Directgov, that it may contain inaccuracies or be misleading, that Directgov remains the official website for government information and services, and that feedback is welcome. It also tells you that the site is using cookies and Google Analytics and explains that more information on cookies can be found at AboutCookies.org. All understandable caveats and disclosures.
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The recent UK case of Hoffman v Drug Abuse Resistance Education (UK) Ltd [2012] EWPCC 2 (19 January 2012) provides a number of important reminders for those who design and own websites, including public sector agencies.

It’s an interesting tale about a website owner who copied photos from another website in the mistaken belief that they were Crown copyright photos that could be re-used without permission when, in fact, they could not. There’s a photographer, a charity, a web developer, a government-sponsored website, the photos and… a copyright infringement claim.
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On Sunday, New Zealand time, the US Congress postponed the Protect IP and the Stop Online Piracy Acts, without any date for the proposed laws to be re-visited.

In the common US contortionist naming of bills, the Protect IP Act stands for Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act (or PIPA) and the Stop Online Piracy Act is known as “SOPA”.

The bills were introduced in mid 2011. The intention of the planned legislation was particularly to stop online piracy of movies and music, but it would have included piracy of software and even counterfeiting of drugs and car parts. Read more…

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