All posts in UX

GOV.UKThose interested in how a single government website may function should take a look at the UK’s beta www.gov.uk site. When you navigate to the site, you’re told immediately that it’s an experimental trial replacement for Directgov, that it may contain inaccuracies or be misleading, that Directgov remains the official website for government information and services, and that feedback is welcome. It also tells you that the site is using cookies and Google Analytics and explains that more information on cookies can be found at AboutCookies.org. All understandable caveats and disclosures.
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A while back now I was drafting a privacy policy for a particular website, when it struck me that one could use a nifty content rendering effect (using, for example, a bit of jQuery) to make navigating privacy policies, terms of use and legislation a better experience for those who actually read them.

Take, for example, an average privacy policy for a site that collects and uses quite a bit of personal information. If the privacy policy has been well drafted, it should cover all bases sufficiently to enable those using the website to know, for example, when their personal information will be collected, the uses to which it will be put, whether any of it will be shared with third parties and who to contact to check and request correction of one’s personal information. Sometimes the need to cover all bases can make for a longish privacy privacy. Yet, it may well be the case that many users only want to find information on a specific issue. The clause or paragraph title should lead them to the right place. But should they have to scroll down through multiple paragraphs? And what if they’d like to read only two or three clauses and see them all in close proximity, even if the clause numbers are far apart?

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